Find some amazing research, talks, articles and content backing how holistic health modalities, breathwork, meditation, yoga, music and vibrational frequencies effect the health of body mind and spirit, allowing us to grow into more grounded, confident and heart centred people and hence can make the world a better place,

firing up human evolution.

How Not to be a Slave to Your Brain: Mindfulness for Mental Health | Mark Epstein | Big Think
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How Not to be a Slave to Your Brain: Mindfulness for Mental Health | Mark Epstein | Big Think

How Not to be a Slave to Your Brain: Mindfulness for Mental Health Watch the newest video from Big Think: https://bigth.ink/NewVideo Join Big Think Edge for exclusive videos: https://bigth.ink/Edge ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Big Think and the Mental Health Channel are proud to launch Big Thinkers on Mental Health, a new series dedicated to open discussion of anxiety, depression, and the many other psychological disorders that affect millions worldwide. One of the classic definitions of mindfulness is that it helps us avoid clinging to what is pleasant and condemning what is unpleasant. In this video, psychiatrist Mark Epstein relays information about the practice of mindful meditation and its many mental health benefits. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- MARK EPSTEIN: Mark Epstein, M.D. is a psychiatrist in private practice in New York City and the author of a number of books about the interface of Buddhism and psychotherapy, including Thoughts without a Thinker, Going to Pieces without Falling Apart, Going on Being, Open to Desire, Psychotherapy without the Self, and The Trauma of Everyday Life. His newest book is Advice Not Given: A Guide to Getting Over Yourself. He received his undergraduate and medical degrees from Harvard University and is currently Clinical Assistant Professor in the Postdoctoral Program in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis at New York University. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- TRANSCRIPT: Mark Epstein: One of the classic definitions of mindfulness is that it helps us not cling to what's pleasant and not condemn what is unpleasant. An example would be if you're driving in New York City and someone cuts you off; that's unpleasant and one would instinctively have an angry response. But that's happening all the time and if you have an angry response too often, then you become a nightmare yourself. So what mindfulness is teaching is that the stimulus, which is someone cutting you off, is different; it's distinct from your emotional reaction to that thing. So someone could cut you off; you could feel the anger, but you don't have to act on the anger. So instead of being driven by your reactions there's a little bit of room where you can choose to be a different kind of person. So mindfulness basically helps us tolerate the aspects of the external world and the internal world that otherwise are hard to face. There are basically two kinds of meditation; one, which is a concentration practice. You focus your attention on a neutral sensation like the feeling of the breath coming in and out of the nostrils or like the repetition of a sound or what's called a mantra. And every time the mind wanders, whenever you notice that it's wandered, that might be five minutes, 10 minutes later when you're lost in thought, but at a certain point you realize, "Oh wait, I'm not watching the breath anymore," then you bring your mind back to the breath. That's called a concentration or a one-pointed practice. And that's the beginning level of mindfulness. When you really start practicing mindfulness, instead of bringing the mind back every time to a central object, you let the attention go wherever the mind goes. So instead of paying attention just to the breath or the mantra, you pay attention to sounds; you pay attention thoughts; you pay attention to the feeling; you pay attention to memories; you pay attention to worries, to anxieties, to anger, to joy; you pay attention to whatever passes through your mind moment to moment. And then what you start to see is that oh everything is changing all the time and you learn to pay attention more to process than to content. It's really only in the past 50, 60 years that the medical establishment has been exposed at all to what mindfulness is. And for 20, 30 of those years it was like just a new age thing. It was on the periphery. And only through the work of a couple of people like Jon Kabat-Zinn has mindfulness come into the medical establishment. There are a lot of studies that are being done now that are showing the benefit of mindfulness for all kinds of conditions. And some old colleagues of mine have done some very good work showing that the steady practice of mindfulness light up areas of the brain that have to do with modulating emotional reactivity. So I think there's beginning evidence that the brain is plastic, more plastic than we initially thought and that what you feed into the brain actually changes the architecture of the brain so that it's possible to promote, to develop the areas of the brain that are there for kindness, you know, for altruistic feeling and for the regulation of difficult emotions.
Sadhguru - Just Pay Attention To Your Breath, Anything You Wish Can Happen | Mystics of India
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Sadhguru - Just Pay Attention To Your Breath, Anything You Wish Can Happen | Mystics of India

Sadhguru shares an Insight on how bringing awareness to your breathing process can transform your life. If you travel through the breath, deep into yourself, to the deepest core of the breath, it will take you to that point where you are actually tied to the body. Breath is not just the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide. For different levels of thought and emotion that you go through, your breath takes on different types of patterns. When you are angry, peaceful, happy or sad, your breathe goes through subtle changes. Whichever way you breathe, that is the way you think. Whichever way you think, that is the way you breathe. The breath can be used as a tool to do many things with the body and the mind. Pranayam is the science where, by consciously breathing in a particular way, the very way you think, feel, understand and experience life can be changed. If you like this video please do share this with your friends & family members or someone who need this here is the link to the video: https://youtu.be/FCq8-XvqU1Q ★ MORE RECOMMENDED VIDEOS FOR YOU ★ If you enjoyed this video, you may enjoy these other videos from Mystics of India • Tomorrow Never Comes - https://goo.gl/63tfgb • Truth of Life - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MkpthksaySQ • Baba Neem Karoli - https://goo.gl/bLZHLw • MUKTI Dubstep Song - https://goo.gl/gogRJh • Sadhguru & His Guru - https://goo.gl/nGd87P ⚑ SUBSCRIBE TO OUR CHANNEL ⚑ If you want to learn & do great things your environment must be great & supportive. Create by subscribing to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/mysticsofindia #CONNECT WITH US ON# Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mysticsofindia/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mysticsofindia/ __________________________________________________________ Thank you for watching - We really appreciate it :) TEAM MOI
Self-Transformation Through Mindfulness | Dr. David Vago | TEDxNashville
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Self-Transformation Through Mindfulness | Dr. David Vago | TEDxNashville

How is the Self represented in the brain and how is it sculpted through our everyday moment-to-moment perceptions, emotions, and thoughts? Cognitive Neuroscientist, David Vago demonstrates that a systematic form of mental training involving meditation and mindful awareness has the potential to transform our self and our mental habits in a positive way. Learn more about how every moment is an opportunity to change our brain and strongly influence our health & longevity at both conscious and non-conscious levels. A Cognitive Neuroscientist by training, David Vago has close to 20 years of experience with mindfulness practice and teaching, and over a decade conducting translational neuroimaging, cognitive, and clinical research on the basic mechanisms and therapeutic relevance of mindfulness and associated meditation/contemplative practices. Through his research, Dr. Vago focuses on one basic question – “What are the basic neurobiological and physiological components that constitute adaptive mind-brain-body interactions and their therapeutic relevance in psychiatric settings?” In addition to being an expert in the emerging field of contemplative neuroscience, David has studied the neural mechanisms of neuropsychiatric disease and chronic pain using fMRI and is translating these findings into biologically-based diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for alleviating suffering. He is the research director at the Osher Center for Integrative Medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and a research associate in the Functional Neuroimaging Laboratory, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
The Scientific Power of Meditation
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The Scientific Power of Meditation

How exactly does meditation affect your body? GET THE BOOK! http://asapscience.com/book SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/10kWnZ7 Written by: Rachel Salt, Gregory Brown and Mitchell Moffit FOLLOW US--- Instagram and Twitter: @whalewatchmeplz and @mitchellmoffit Clickable: http://bit.ly/16F1jeC and http://bit.ly/15J7ube Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1fjWszw Twitter: http://bit.ly/1d84R71 Tumblr: http://bit.ly/1amIPjF Vine: Search "AsapSCIENCE" on vine! Created by Mitchell Moffit (twitter @mitchellmoffit) and Gregory Brown (twitter @whalewatchmeplz). ----References---- Colzato, L.S., A. Ozturk, and B. Hommel, Meditate to create: the impact of focused-attention and open-monitoring training on convergent and divergent thinking. Frontiers in Psychology, 2012. 3(116): p. 1-5. Davidson, R.J., et al., Alterations in brain and immune function produced by mindfulness meditation. Psychosomatic Medicine, 2003. 65: p. 564-570. Goyal, M., et al., Meditation programs for psychological stress and well-being a systematic review and meta-analysis. JAMA Internal Medicine, 2011. 174(3): p. 357-368. Farb, N.A.S., et al., Minding one’s emotions: mindfulness training alters the neural expression of sadness. Emotion, 2010. 10(1): p. 25-33. 9. Kerr, C.E., et al., Effects of mindfulness meditation training on anticipatory alpha modulation in primary somatosensory cortex. Brain Research Bulletin, 2011. 85: p. 96-103. Ditto, B., M. Eclache, and N. Goldman, Short-term autonomic and cardiovascular effects of mindfulness body scan meditation. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 2006. 32: p. 228-234. Epel, E., et al., Can meditation slow rate of cellular aging, cognitive stress, mindfulness, and telomeres. Longevity, regeneration, and optimal health, 2009. 1172: p. 34-53. Kilpatrick, L.A., et al., Impact of mindfulness-based stress reduction training on intrinsic brain connectivity. NeuroImage, 2011. 56: p. 290–298. Ospina, M.B., et al., Clinical trials of meditation practices in health care:characteristics and quality. The Journal of Alternative And Complementary Medicine, 2008. 14(10): p. 1199–1213. Yu, X., et al., Activation of the anterior prefrontal cortex and serotonergic system is associated with improvements in mood and EEG changes induced by Zen meditation practice in novices. International Journal of Psychophysiology, 2011. 80: p. 103-111. Hölzel, B.K., et al., Mindfulness practice leads to increases in regional brain gray matter density. Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging, 2011. 191: p. 36-43. Luders, E., et al., The unique brain anatomy of meditation practitioners: alterations in cortical gyrification. frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 2012. 6(34): p. 1-9. Hasenkamp, W. and L.W. Barsalou, Effects of meditation experience on functional connectivity of distributed brain networks. frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 2012. 6(38): p. 1-14. Carlson, L.E., et al., Mindfulness-based cancer recovery and supportive-expressive therapy maintain telomere length relative to controls in distressed breast cancer survivors.
The Secrets Of Vibration & Frequency! (The Power Of Sound!)
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The Secrets Of Vibration & Frequency! (The Power Of Sound!)

Become a $5 Patreon member for access to *Special content 🤫 I can't share here... https://www.patreon.com/youarecreators #lawofattraction #createreality #manifest #Manifestation 📚Purchase YouAreCreators best selling books here: ►222 Prosperity Affirmations: http://geni.us/2HhW7 ►I Wish I Knew This 20 Years Ago: http://geni.us/wZx6 ►The Little Book Of Successful Secrets: http://geni.us/qWsNN09 ►The Mind Of Money: http://geni.us/MJXJBr ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Linktree https://linktr.ee/YouAreCreatorstv ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ We (YouAreCreators) created this channel to share one of the greatest secrets of the universe, and the secret is, we literally create our reality! (Quantum Physics now proves this) We are all governed by a set of Universal Laws, and these laws were created by GOD, to aid us in creating the life we desire. One of these laws is known as the "Law Of Attraction", or the law of "Reaping and Sowing". This law simply states, whatever you give out in Thought, Word, Feeling, and Action is returned to us. Whether the return is negative, or positive, failure or success, is all up to what you give out. Many authors and celebrities such as, Wayne Dyer, Oprah Winfrey, Will Smith, Jim Carrey, Steve Harvey, Rhonda Byrne, and many others have testified to this amazing Law Of Attraction. It's time you learn this wonderful secret...